Past Data Management Workshops

Data Management Workshop Series

We are not currently offering any new workshops, but have an archive containing previous workshops with a wide range of topics related to research data management.  Just click on the title of the workshop below to access the content.  Workshops that include supplemental materials are packaged as ZIP files.  If you have topic ideas for other workshops, would like to know more about a particular topic, or would like to arrange a meeting to discuss your research data management needs and concerns, please email us at dmconsult@virginia.edu.

To keep up with new offerings, be sure to subscribe to the Research Data Services & Sciences newsletter (you can also browse past issues of the newsletter).

Spring 2015

Creating a Data Management Plan (Sherry Lake)  Do you need a data management plan? Do you know what it is, and why you should need one? What’s your plan for managing the data from your current and proposed research projects? This workshop is designed to help researchers understand what is required to write management plans for funding applications and understand the general benefit for managing research data and results.

Introduction to Database Design (Sherry Lake) When data gets too unwieldy for storage in basic text files or spreadsheets, databases may be a good solution.  This workshop covers the steps to design a database and includes hands on activities.

Building Databases and Querying with MySQL (Sherry Lake) This workshop leads you through creating a MySQL database using ITS’s MySQL Database service. It also covers querying and using MySQL and/or SQL databases with several software packages (including Excel, SAS).

Fall 2014 

Introduction to Database Design (Sherry Lake) When data gets too unwieldy for storage in basic text files or spreadsheets, databases may be a good solution. This workshop covers the steps to design a database and include hands on activities.

Building and Using MS Access Databases (Sherry Lake) This workshop will lead you through creating a database in Microsoft Access. It also covers querying and using MS Access database with several software packages (including Excel, SAS).  Prior attendance at the Introduction of Database Design or familiarity with databases would be helpful.

Creating a Data Management Plan (Bill Corey) What’s your plan for managing the data from your current and proposed research projects? This data management planning workshop is designed to help researchers understand what is required to write management plans for funding applications.

Creating & Querying SQL & MySQL Databases (Sherry Lake) This workshop will lead you through creating a MySQL database using ITS’s MySQL Database service. It also covers querying and using MySQL and/or SQL databases with several software packages (including Excel, SAS). Prior attendance at the Introduction to Database Design or familiarity with databases would be helpful.

Data Documentation and Metadata (Sherry Lake and Anne Gaynor) A critical part of making data usable and shareable is to ensure they can be understood and interpreted by others. This requires clear and detailed data description, annotation and contextual information.  You will need to retain details about your data collection and methodology at least until the end of your project.  Learn about and explore tools like Colectica, Nesstar, Morpho, and iPhoto that will help you document your data while you collect and analyze it.

Best Practices for Data Management (Ricky Patterson and Andrea Denton-Health Sciences Library)  What are your data management practices for your research data? This workshop is designed to help researchers incorporate some best practices for data management into their own research environment.  It addresses such questions as: What standards for file naming and metadata will you use? What repository will you deposit your data into? Do you need permission to share your data?  It discusses critical components of data management planning, provides hands-on practice with methods to name and organize files, reviews helpful data management resources, and will give you a framework to develop your own data management plan.

Creating a DMP (Sherry Lake) What’s your plan for managing the data from your current and proposed research projects? This data management planning workshop is designed to help researchers understand what is required to write management plans for funding applications.

Collaboration Management Tools (Bill Corey) What tools are available at UVa to help you manage collaborating on your research? This workshop will demonstrate some of the available tools in UVaCollab, UVa Box, and the WebDAV protocol and how they interact with each other.

Decennial Census: Finding and Accessing Data (Summer Durrant) There are many different products available, both commercial and free, for finding and using current and historical decennial census data.  This workshop explores four of these products—Social Explorer, GeoLytics Neighborhood Change Database, IPUMS USA, and NHGIS—and will demonstrate how to select data and export files in various formats.  Attendees should have a basic understanding of the decennial census.

Data Preservation (Bill Corey and Kara McClurken) What will you do to ensure that your research data will be reusable by you or others tomorrow, five years from now, even ten years from now?  This workshop is designed to provide researchers with best practices for preserving their digital and analog research data.

Preserving and Sharing Data: Best Practices & Requirements for Selecting a Data Sharing Repository (Bill Corey) You’ve finished your project, and need to find a location to store or share your data.  We’ll look at the best practices and requirements for selecting an appropriate data sharing repository.  You’ll learn about the repository registries, how to search them for available options for your data and what you will need to deposit it in them.  We’ll also show you how to create your own repository on the Dataverse Network if none of the existing repositories are appropriate.

Spring 2014

Introduction to Designing and Building Databases (Sherry Lake and Nancy Kechner) When data gets too unwieldy for storage in basic text files or spreadsheets, databases may be a good solution. This workshop covers database fundamentals and guide you through the three steps of database design.

Documentation and Metadata (Anne Gaynor and Sherry Lake) A critical part of making data usable and shareable is to ensure they can be understood and interpreted by others. This requires clear and detailed data description, annotation and contextual information. In addition, you will need to retain details about your data collection and methodology at least until the end of your project. Data documentation and metadata is a vital part of managing your research data that needs to be done throughout the project, not just at the end.

Data Management for Graduate Students I: Why Should You Care about Managing Your Research? (Sherry Lake, Bill Corey and Purdom Lindblad-Scholars Lab) Does your research result in stacks of books, folders of newspaper clippings, boxes of photographs, digital files, and more? How do you keep connections between physical and digital materials? This workshop introduces the ‘what and why’ of managing your research. We will explore your individual practices as we assess a variety of research management practices.

Data Management for Graduate Students II: Data Management for Humanists (Sherry Lake, Bill Corey and Purdom Lindblad-Scholars Lab) This workshop covers best practices for collecting and organizing humanities and social sciences research related to the goal of data preservation and sharing. We will focus on best practices and tips for collecting data, including file naming, and documentation/metadata.

Finding and Acquiring Data (Bill Corey and Summer Durrant) You’re looking for data for your project: where do you find it and how do you acquire it?  You’ll learn how to identify potential sources of data, locate the data you need, and how to gain access to it.  We’ll explore the library’s collections and subscriptions, in addition to data residing in repositories that can be identified by data citations and article references.

Managing Collaborations (Bill Corey) Much research is done collaboratively — between colleagues, graduate students, and fellow researchers at UVa and across institutions We’ll look at tools to facilitate and manage research collaborations. Do you need a ‘static’ tool that provides safe and secure file sharing, a ‘dynamic’ tool that will allow interactive editing of documents, a tool that will allow virtual face-to-face discussions and presentations?  We’ll look at what is available from the University, and some of the openly available options.

Planning for Data Management (Ricky Patterson and Andrea Denton-Health Sciences Library) What’s your plan for managing all the data from your research? Did you know that all federal agencies with budgets over $100M will soon require data management plans outlining how you will provide access to your research data? What metadata standard will you use? What repository will you deposit your data into? Will your data be restricted or fully open? We will cover critical components of data management planning to help you get started, introduce you to available resources, and give you an opportunity to develop your own data management plan for a grant. The workshop will conclude with peer and expert feedback on draft data management plans produced during the workshop. We welcome all researchers; faculty, graduate students, and others.

Fall 2013

Versioning (Sherry Lake and Bill Corey) If you’ve ever tried to work on a collaborative project, whether it be writing a paper, sharing information, or managing data, you’ve likely experienced some challenges in identifying the most current version of a work. This workshop looks at how software tools can be used to automatically track versions of a file, record changes, and help you maintain more order in your collaborative projects.

Data Wrangling and Interoperability (Ricky Patterson and Andrea Denton-Health Sciences Library) One issue that is sometimes overlooked until too late is that data is naturally a messy thing. Research projects often incorporate data from many sources, in many formats, and with many different conditions around how it was collected and what it represents. This session looks at how to manage such issues and wrangle data into a form that makes longer-term analysis, use, management, and preservation a possibility.

Choosing between data sharing repositories for Engineering (Sherry Lake)

Choosing between data sharing repositories for the Humanities (Bill Corey)

Choosing between data sharing repositories for the Life Sciences (Andrea Denton-Health Sciences Library)

Choosing between data sharing repositories for Social Sciences (Bill Corey)

After all the hard work and labor of producing research data, we hope that you’ll consider what you should do to preserve and share it with others. Beyond complying with many funding requirements and professional association norms, sharing data in an appropriate repository can help you gain a competitive advantage in your research by making your work more widely accessible. This, in turn, may lead to more citations of your work and broader impact. In the workshop, we will cover the steps needed to share data and how to choose the best location for sharing your data.

Best Practices for Collecting Data (Bill Corey and Andrea Denton-Health Sciences Library) This workshop focuses on best practices for collecting and organizing data. It is increasingly important to store and document research data in ways that facilitate their effective retrieval and interpretation in the future.  These best practices and tips will benefit you, the data collector, as well as improve prospects for the long-term preservation and re-use of data by others.

Data Management: Documentation and Metadata for Engineering and Physical Sciences (Ivey Glendon and Jeremy Bartczak-Health Sciences Library) A critical part of making data usable and shareable is to ensure they can be understood and interpreted by others. This requires clear and detailed data description, annotation and contextual information. In addition, you will need to retain details about your data collection and methodology at least until the end of your project. Data documentation and metadata is a vital part of managing your research data that needs to be done throughout the project, not just at the end.

Introduction to Databases for Managing Research Data (Sherry Lake and Bill Corey) When data gets too unwieldy for storage in basic text files or spreadsheets, databases may be a good solution. This session covered database fundamentals and how to get started in developing a proper database to manage your research data. In addition to the modeling and construction of database, there will also be discussion of how to decide which database software or tool to use and the various decision points to consider.

Workflow Systems for Life Sciences and Social Sciences (Bill Corey and Andrea Denton-Health Sciences Library) In addition to planning, documenting, and establishing best practices for your research, you might also consider using a workflow system to automate and track some of the routine steps you take. This session will cover some of the tools available for managing workflows and how you might incorporate those into your routine.

Workflow Systems for Engineering and Physical Sciences (Andrew Sallans) In addition to planning, documenting, and establishing best practices for your research, you might also consider using a workflow system to automate and track some of the routine steps you take. This session will cover some of the tools available for managing workflows and how you might incorporate those into your routine.

Spring 2013

Data Management: Documentation and Metadata (Sherry Lake, Bill Corey, Jeremy Bartczak-Health Sciences Library)  A critical part of making data usable and shareable is to ensure they can be understood and interpreted by others. This requires clear and detailed data description, annotation and contextual information. Data documentation is a vital part of managing your research data that needs to be done throughout the project, not just at the end.

Gaining an Advantage by Sharing Your Research Data (Andrew Sallans and Bill Corey)  This session will aim to make the case for how sharing of research data can have a positive impact upon your scholarly reputation, and not only be a matter of meeting a set of funding requirements.  We will discuss a variety of advantage points, resources which make it easier, best places to share, and specifically how to get credit for sharing.